The Official Portal to the Madness of Dark Fiction Author Patrick C. Greene

Interviews

Patrick C. Greene Unveils g. Elmer Munson

wiw NEW COVERg. Elmer Munson is the author of the story

JOHN

in the new anthology from Sekhmet Press

WRAPPED IN WHITE

Thirteen Tales of Spectres, Ghosts, and Spirits

Hi g. Elmer! Thank you for joining me today. Let’s kick off this interview with the most important question. Have you ever encountered a ghost?

I certainly hope I’m not the minority on this one, but I don’t believe in ghosts. I don’t believe in much, really. Obligatory back story time! When I was a kid, I grew up in a house that just about everybody thought was haunted. Some still do. The prior residents were apparently Satanists. There were bizarre paintings all over the house and outbuildings (like symbols, inverted crosses, and all that). There was one building full of chicken bones and a super creepy Satan (horns and all) painted on the wall. People would tell me about crazy stuff that went on in the house before we moved in and my father gutted the place. Everyone thought they saw and heard things all the time, and for a long time I thought I did too. Then I moved away and life events changed me completely.  I became what some like to call a “hardcore rationalist”, and my capacity for belief pretty much went away. What didn’t go away is one thing: the memory of how good it felt to be scared, to really believe that bad things were waiting around each corner, and to be so scared at night that I tucked my blankets in all around me so nothing could get in. I didn’t sleep with my head in the open until I was in my late teens. These days there are precious few places I can get that feeling from, hence my love of dark fiction. 

What kind of music do you listen to for inspiration?

I’m a metalhead at heart. If it’s loud and screaming, I’m probably in. However, I don’t really listen to anything except classical while writing. Anything with a beat takes me out of the story. Editing, though…that’s a different animal altogether. That’s the time for screaming.

Have you ever started a project, felt it run out of steam and had to abandon it? 

Unfortunately yes, and I find myself thinking about the “what-ifs” from time to time. I’ve even gotten close to 30k words on a project and it just…stopped. It mocks me to this day, staring in my “limbo” list with bold letters. Of course, there is always the chance for a happy ending. I once got about 15k into a novella, stopped working on it for over a year, then finished, edited, and wrapped it within a period of 6 months. It’s currently looking for a home. I just had to wait for the story to speak to me again.

What’s the most shocking book or story you’ve ever read?

Oooh, good question. A tough one, too, since I’ve been reading for more years than I care to admit! I’ll go with a recent read: Cannibal Fat Camp by David Hayes and Mark Scioneaux. I wouldn’t call it shocking in a scandalous way, but it’s the first book in years to make me stop reading, stand up in amazement at what I’d just read, and laugh until I couldn’t breathe…more than once. It’s a great book.

Do you remember a particular moment or incident that made you decide to be a writer?

I went through a phase in the 90’s where I was unemployed for a while and pretty much miserable. I had a lot of free time on my hands, so I spent an awful lot of it reading. One day I just thought I’d give it a go (what else was I going to do?) and what I wrote really sucked. I think that made me want to get better. After a decade in the military spent NOT writing, I found the urge to write once again. By this point I had gone through graduate school and understood writing quite a bit better than in the 90’s.

Do you have a certain space and time set aside for writing or is it more of a free-form process?

Totally free-form. I wish I could have dedicated time, but with the various “real world” obligations I have, I write when I can. Sometimes I get the luxury of sitting at a desk in front of a computer, sometimes it’s a laptop on the couch, sometimes it’s a tablet in bed, and sometimes it’s talking to my phone while driving. Most of the time, I write while standing in the kitchen with my laptop sitting on top of the microwave. I have no idea why.

How would you describe your writing style?

I write by the seat of my pants. I tend to get an idea and just start writing, usually with no clue as to where the story is going. The good part of this is that the story is always new to me. The bad part is I can easily write myself into a corner (see the “run out of steam” question above). Even so, I’ll take that chance because there’s not much better than this: being honestly surprised at something you just wrote because you never saw it coming

What other sorts of themes or genres would you like to explore?

I’ve said this before, but I’d like to write something where no one dies; just a piece of commercial fiction that anyone could pick up and enjoy. I don’t know if that’s possible though. Once the words start to flow, the blood follows close behind…

Please briefly describe your path to publication.

I try not to think about it. I write and write and write, then edit, edit, edit, edit, edit, edit. When I think I’m done, I send it out. When someone picks it up, we edit some more. I wish editing was the fun part.

Who are your favorite fictional antagonist and protagonist and what was it about them that struck a chord for you?

I’ve always been a huge fan of Steven King’s Gunslinger. Shooting guns, killing people, not giving a damn…he’s just cool, you know? I dig a “good guy” who kills everyone. The first story I ever wrote had a protagonist that suspiciously resembled Roland the Gunslinger. Of course, there was a big difference: mine sucked.

As for antagonists, I think the thing from The Thing (1984) is damn creepy. What really does it for me is how no one knows who’s real. Once everyone stops trusting each other, it jumps straight to all bad. That’s the kind of tension you just can’t buy.

Aside from writing, what is your favorite artistic medium?

I love writing music. I’ve been playing and writing music since I was a kid. Actually, I still do, but it’s something I have little time to enjoy. Given 10 minutes of peace, I’d rather work on a story. 

Thanks again for joining me today and letting us get to know you better. I wish you the best of luck with Wrapped In White and all of your future endeavours.

***

ge1g. Elmer Munson is a New England writer of the strange and unusual as well as the horrors of everyday life.
He lives with his family and a posse of various critters in a creaky farmhouse that’s older than America herself.

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Patrick C. Greene Unveils Suzi M

wiw NEW COVERSuzi M is the author of the story

UNSEEN

in the new anthology from Sekhmet Press

WRAPPED IN WHITE

Thirteen Tales of Spectres, Ghosts, and Spirits

Hi Suzi M! Thank you for joining me today. Let’s kick off this interview with the most important question.Have you ever encountered a ghost?

I think the real question is ‘How MANY ghosts have I encountered’. The answer is yes, many. I grew up in a haunted house with a decent number of ghosts on the property. In fact, one of the scenes in my story is straight out of an experience I had in my parents’ house one night.

What kind of music do you listen to for inspiration?

Anything with a kickass bassline and drumbeat. I’m all about the vibe while writing.

Have you ever started a project, felt it run out of steam and had to abandon it?

No, but I have sent a few projects to sit in the corner and think about what they’ve done.

What’s the most shocking book or story you’ve ever read?

To date? The Holographic Universe by Michael Talbot. Not because it was meant to be ‘shocking’ in the horror sense, but because it set off a string of ideas I’m still unraveling to this day.

Do you remember a particular moment or incident that made you decide to be a writer?

I was born. Nothing really made me decide to become a writer, I suspect it was always there, lurking jus beneath the surface. What spawned my first novel was a bet with my AP English teacher in high school, however. We had been given ‘laptops’ (thing was a 20lb brick as far as I was concerned), and I refused to use it. She told me to go ahead and try writing a sentence, so I did. It was: “Nemesis gazed out over the cold stone walls of his castle at the bleak gray landscape, laughing under his breath.” She read it, liked it, and told me to write a paragraph, and before I knew it I had an entire first draft of a novel completed by summer vacation.

Do you have a certain space and time set aside for writing or is it more of a free-form process?

I write in bursts, whenever and wherever I have a spare minute or an idea that needs to get jotted down.

How would you describe your writing style?

In one word: chaotic.

What other sorts of themes or genres would you like to explore?

I’ve been exploring the realm of paranormal mystery with my James Glass scribblings lately, but have been known to wander into post apocalyptic and plain old horror.

Please briefly describe your path to publication.

Largely accidental and not really intentional.

Who are your favorite fictional antagonist and protagonist and what was it about them that struck a chord for you?

My favorite – ‘personality’ I’ll call it, because he’s really neither antagonist nor protagonist – is my own creation by name of Nemesis. I love his passion and his ability to be absolutely insane yet still retain that element of seduction beneath it all. He runs mainly on instinct and pure reaction with no thought to the consequences. Sometimes it’s not such a great thing, and then he deals with the outcomes as they arise. He’s the flipside to my coin.

Aside from writing, what is your favorite artistic medium?

There are a few. Knitting, painting, drawing, spinning yarn, weaving, sculpting, etc.

Thanks again for joining me today and letting us get to know you better. I wish you the best of luck with Wrapped In White and all of your future endeavours.

***

suzi m titled

Lurking in a Pennsylvania town near historicGettysburg, Suzi M is weaving webs of horror: including gothic, noir, ghosts, demons, angels, occult, and the occasional historic and/or post-apocalyptic thriller. Her storytelling has been compared to that of Tanith Lee , HP Lovecraft, and Douglas Adams. Writing under multiple pseudonyms, including James Glass, Suzi’s writing reflects and explores the thrill and the secrecy; the untold mysteries waiting in the shadows. In addition to a few other humans, including the tiny Hypnospawn, Suzi shares her home with a 30lb black house panther named Mr. Pants. When she’s not busy with her own work or getting pictures and autographs with people who recognize her on the street, Suzi helps support the efforts of independent artists, writers, musicians, and film-makers. She is also a self-described “fiberfreak,” finding time to spin, knit, crochet or weave when the muse allows. She will most likely achieve fame and fortune with her hand-crafted socks.

***

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Explore THE SMILING GOTH


Patrick C. Greene Unveils Joshua Rex

wiw NEW COVER

CLICK to BUY on Amazon

Joshua Rex is the author of the story

THE WHITE BOY

 in the new anthology from Sekhmet Press

WRAPPED IN WHITE

Thirteen Tales of Spectres, Ghosts, and Spirits

Hi Joshua! Thank you for joining me today. Let’s kick off this interview with the most important question. Have you ever encountered a ghost?

When I was a kid, I saw a woman in white in my hallway who I thought was my mother but was not. A few years ago, I filmed a thick mist around a tombstone that I’d done a painting of. Were these ghosts? Who knows. Either way it was interesting.

What kind of music do you listen to for inspiration?

I like instrumental stuff like Rachel’s and Dustin O’Halloran. Also, Henry VIII’s music is pretty fantastic.

Have you ever started a project, felt it run out of steam and had to abandon it?

I think the danger is running out of steam after a project is finished. When you’re done with the work, that’s only half the battle…the other half is getting it out there so it can be read/seen/heard so that it doesn’t become a relic in your closet.

What’s the most shocking book or story you’ve ever read?

AE Van Vogt’s “The Enchanted Village” is a good one. Also, “Pet Sematary”.

Do you remember a particular moment or incident that made you decide to be a writer?

No, but I do remember thinking I was going to have to just give it a go, even if it turned out really bad, because the ideas demanded it. Since then it’s been all about working every day to make it better.

Do you have a certain space and time set aside for writing or is it more of a free-form process?

An hour (revising) every morning, and an hour (writing) every night. I wish both could be tripled…

How would you describe your writing style?

Traditional and straight forward as I can make it, though it usually takes ten drafts to achieve this. I want the work to be story driven, and for myself to be as transparent as possible.

What other sorts of themes or genres would you like to explore?

I’m game for any theme or genre as long as the idea is good and strong enough

Please briefly describe your path to publication.

I wrote the rough draft of a novel in 2011 and then a bunch of short stories afterwards. I started submitting the shorter works to magazines/podcasts/journals in 2012 and was lucky enough to get a piece accepted by Pseudopod.org on my third try!

Who are your favorite fictional antagonist and protagonist and what was it about them that struck a chord for you?

I’d say Hannibal Lector for the antagonist, though he could also be considered a protagonist I suppose. Santiago from The Old Man and the Sea for the protagonist, though I think the same could be said about him as well…

Aside from writing, what is your favorite artistic medium?

I’ve had the most success as a painter, and spent the most time as a musician. 

Thanks again for joining me today and letting us get to know you better. I wish you the best of luck with Wrapped In White and all of your future endeavours.

***

Joshua RexJoshua Rex is a writer, painter, and musician who works with stringed instruments in Boston, MA. His work has appeared on Pseudopod.org, in Death Throes webzine and most recently the anthology ‘Wrapped in White’ from Sekhmet Press. He recently finished a collection of short stories entitled ‘New Monsters’ and is currently revising his first novel.


Patrick C. Greene Unveils Allison M. Dickson

wiw NEW COVER

CLICK to BUY on Amazon

Allison M. Dickson is the author of the story

DADDY’S GLASSES

in the new anthology from Sekhmet Press

WRAPPED IN WHITE

Thirteen Tales of Spectres, Ghosts, and Spirits

Hi Allison! Thank you for joining me today. Let’s kick off this interview with the most important question. Have you ever encountered a ghost?

 I’ve encountered very strange and palpable energies, particularly in abandoned buildings. I have a bit of an obsession with old architecture and feel like walls are sponges for the things that happen between them. I’ve walked through houses two centuries old as well as an abandoned mental hospital from the early 20th century and the feeling of residual life in them is unmistakable and chilling. I don’t know if this translates as “ghosts” per se, or more to an active imagination and sense of empathy, but it’s as close as I’ve ever come to something “other.”

What kind of music do you listen to for inspiration?

I live on a combination of Nine Inch Nails, Radiohead, Massive Attack, and movie scores by Clint Mansell, though I am also a big fan of the score for The Red Violin and anything by Hans Zimmer.

Have you ever started a project, felt it run out of steam and had to abandon it?

Are you kidding me? I’ve had that happen with more projects than haven’t. My file of unfinished or half-started projects is huge. And it’s lucky that I never throw anything away because my upcoming book, THE LAST SUPPER, was just such a project. It was out of steam for three years until I picked it up and found new life lurking in it.

What’s the most shocking book or story you’ve ever read?

That would have to be Haunted by Chuck Palahniuk. Particularly the story “Guts.” I haven’t been the same since I read that.

Do you remember a particular moment or incident that made you decide to be a writer?

I’ve been writing most of my life, but I the moment I decided I needed to do this for real was after I read DUMA KEY by Stephen King. It called to a dormant part of me and slapped it into wakefulness. There are so many great quotes from the book that call to the artists in us all, but this one is my favorite: “Stay hungry. It worked for Michelangelo, it worked for Picasso, and it works for a hundred thousand artists who do it not for love (although that might play a part) but in order to put food on the table. If you want to translate the world, you need to use your appetites. Does this surprise you? It shouldn’t. There’s no creation without talent, I give you that, but talent is cheap. Talent goes begging. Hunger is the piston of art.” It was a complete rebirth for me when I discovered I was truly hungry and decided to feed myself.

Do you have a certain space and time set aside for writing or is it more of a free-form process?

Definitely a free-form kind of thing. I try to get a good part of my writing done in the daytime hours when everyone is gone, but sometimes things don’t work out that way and I stay up a little late to get things done. I split my time between my laptop/recliner and my office. Some stories require a certain posture.

How would you describe your writing style?

I’m a pretty straightforward, no-frills kind of writer. My sentences don’t get too long in most cases, and I keep my vocabulary pretty simple. I do like description and voice, but I’m not terribly poetic or lyrical about it. Dialect slips in from time to time, but not overly so. I value clarity above all else. I like writers who settle down into their language like a well-worn pair of shoes and don’t get too pretentious with it, and that’s what I aim to be. You can usually tell when a writer is trying to grandstand with the language instead of just telling the story.

What other sorts of themes or genres would you like to explore?

I’m just now starting to get more into crime and suspense genres, and I really love it. Dark contemporary fantasy is another genre I’d like to spend more time in, and I have a few projects up my sleeves for that. One is an expansion on my story “Devil Riders” and another is a story about baseball, deities, and small town organized crime I currently have on a back burner.

Please briefly describe your path to publication.

Place pen on paper, make one giant scribble. That’s my path. Honestly, if Vincent Hobbes hadn’t found one of my free stories on Amazon, I don’t know where I’d be right now. I’d had a few short story credits and was making my way slowly into the indie world, but if he hadn’t found me, I’m not sure either Strings or The Last Supper would have happened, and I never would have met you or your wife and I wouldn’t be in Wrapped in White. One thing leads to another.

Who are your favorite fictional antagonist and protagonist and what was it about them that struck a chord for you?

Roland Deschain of The Dark Tower series is by far my favorite protagonist, probably because he also serves as his own antagonist. He’s a man driven by his own demons and obsessions to do both great and terrible things.

Aside from writing, what is your favorite artistic medium?

Movies and food. I’d love to have a career in both one day. Hey, maybe I’ll have a craft services business in Hollywood, where I can serve donuts to the stars!

Just be sure to save me a few! Thanks again for joining me today and letting us get to know you better. I wish you the best of luck with Wrapped In White and all of your future endeavours.

***

Image of Allison M. Dickson

Allison M. Dickson is a writer of dark contemporary fiction. Two of her short stories currently appear in The Endlands Volume 2 from Hobbes End Publishing, and two of her collected works are currently available on Amazon along with her indie pulp novel, COLT COLTRANE AND THE LOTUS KILLER. Her debut novel STRINGS, a psychological suspense story, released to rave reviews from Hobbes End, and the same publisher will be releasing her dystopian sci-fi book, THE LAST SUPPER, in spring of 2014. When she’s not writing, she’s co-hosting a weekly podcast, Creative Commoners. After spending several years in Olympia, Washington she returned with her husband and kids to her native Midwest and currently resides in Dayton, OH.


Smashwords Interviews Patrick C. Greene

Welcome to Smashwords, Patrick C. Greene.

You currently utilize Smashwords to present the readers with “permanent freebies” – What are your future plans with Smashwords?

Yes. That is correct. One of my publishers, Sekhmet Press, offers a few of my older short stories for free.  Although, my best-selling short story, Bill’s Becoming, is now also available via Smashwords (iTunes, Barnes & Noble, Kobos…) for $0.99. And I believe that trend may continue.  My entire catalog is available via Amazon – short stories, anthologies from Hobbes End, Sekhmet Press and Rymfire Books, and my novel PROGENY from Hobbes End Publishing.

What is the first work of fiction you remember writing?

I wrote a story about a giant praying mantis for school when I was in 1st or 2nd grade. When it was time to introduce my monster, I spelled out ‘GIANT PRAYING MANTIS!’ in scary font. I had this affinity for weird bugs and lizards.

Your work, while definitely horror, seems to reach into other genres as well. Is that something you do consciously?

I believe a story of any genre should be first and foremost, a drama. People joke that The Walking Dead for example, consists of more scenes with the characters arguing than battling zombies. Even George Romero has leveled that criticism. But the strong characters and their efforts to remain the people they were before shit went bad is what keeps the series going. Romero’s films themselves were heavy on the drama.I became interested in martial arts and action films at a young age so I do tend to draw from that to build characters and create suspense. Maintaining a breathless pace seems to work well for many of the scenarios in which I write, but I love a good mood piece as well. And of course, you can’t deny the opportunities for scares in the sci-fi genre.

You have a story in the vampire short story collection Wrapped In Red as well as a vampire novel coming soon. What is your opinion of the current state of vampires?

A few years back when Interview With A Vampire was being adapted to film, there was already some dispute over beautiful, angsty vamps versus the more straight forward Nosferatu types. If we trace the lore all the way back to its origins in old Europe, we find a nasty, mindless, completely feral creature with little humanity. It was probably Stoker who brought a little romance to their game, so really, who are any of us to be critical of one type of vamp over another? There are nearly as many variations of them as there humankind.That said, we should probably try to settle on a general set of guidelines. I haven’t read or seen Twilight, but I doubt there’s a context in which that kind of vampire is scary. So bottom line: let’s keep them scary!

What are your favorite types of monsters and sub-genres of horror?

I’ve always had a soft spot for Japanese monsters. Nobody imagines a monster quite like the Japanese, from the Godzilla/Gamera films to their most twisted anime’. I’ve also gone through phases with all the Universal classics, and as you might imagine, I find the legendary monsters of cryptozoological lore to be endlessly fascinating. Ultimately, a monster that is or was human is the most interesting.

You’re an avowed fan of kung fu films and martial arts in general, often giving your characters fighting experience. Do you feel it’s possible to combine martial arts and horror and make it work?

The Resident Evil films have done okay with that kind of crossover I think. There are actually a good many examples, but I think it’s a thin line. If you’re protagonist is too powerful or heroic then your villain is not as scary, and scares are priority one. Chuck Norris was in a movie called Silent Rage that worked in starts and stops. It’s the same reason horror comedies generally fail; one or the other, folks. Let’s not try to get too cute.

As a screenwriter, how do you feel when you see great horror books adapted for the screen?

I’d rather see great films adapted as books! It’s asking a lot of people who are hamstrung by budget, by creative input from several conflicting contributors, and by everything from weather to location, to ask them to do justice to a book which is really limited only by imagination. They should all be viewed with that understanding. I say, if it draws attention to a great source material then it’s all good.

Your short Silver Surrogate is so surreal, at times it’s just this side of a nightmare. How hard was it to attain that level of oddness?

As any writer will tell you, most stories seem to just be filtering themselves through you. I felt the best way to maintain some kind of dream-like feel was to not set boundaries, in terms of “this” reality versus that of dreams, or free-form drawing, or what have you. So once the characters started doing things that didn’t necessarily make sense at first glance, I knew I couldn’t fight it. I had to let them play out their sick, irrational schemes and hope none of it spilled over into my mind or this–our, world.

Horror is a genre of ever changing trends. What do you see as the future of horror?

It seems we can always count on a handful of archetypes, all leading back to the unknown. Teens will always go camping, scientists will always play God, humans will always want more than they have at an unimaginable cost. As technology begins to take over our lives I think the future of horror will be based around -not the negative effects of that technology, a la Terminator, but the potential loss of it. Already, every horror film has to create a scenario in which cell phones don’t function or are broken or lost. The long-forgotten Y2K scare might have taught us a lesson about the over-reliance on tech, but instead it only served as a Boy Who Cried Wolf, and we are all the villagers, inured to the alarms that have proven false one too many times. Many of us are over-reliant to the point that I can see mass hysteria taking hold tomorrow if we lose internet service, or the ability to text and thus be forced to engage in terrifying person to person communication.

You’ve taken to posting horror haiku on your facebook and twitter accounts on a regular basis. What is the origin story of that?

The first one came about a few years back when a horror website, Dread Central I believe, ran a contest, the entry requirement of which was to submit a haiku based on the Hellraiser mythos. It came pretty easily, and I enjoyed how the form caused me to attempt to evoke a feeling or even tell a story in such strict structure. I like to believe that in a past life, I was a samurai who was renowned for my ability to tell amazing ghost stories that shivered the bones of even the most hardened battlefield veterans.

You’re a self-described aficionado of dark art. In this age of ebooks, what are your feelings on cover art for horror books?

I confess that I miss the painted covers of the past; even the bad ones. It seems to be easier to compose a cover these days and some, digital or otherwise, are very good, very evocative. My wife, chief of Sekhmet Press has gotten to be quite nimble in coming up with covers and advertising materials, so my hat’s off to her and anyone who can create an eye-catching piece. The cover for Progeny, by Jordan Benoit, is outstanding, and I’m darkly blessed to have his work calling attention to mine.Of course, these days we’re dealing with much smaller images when our potential reader is scanning amazon for their next read. They have to be brighter and perhaps more to the point. It may be true that you can’t judge a book by its cover, but that cover still has to present some element of the book’s feel and/or plot to draw in the reader, so I believe it’s something worth fretting over, especially for newer or indie authors. Right behind editing services, a good cover artist is a worthwhile investment.

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Possessed or Dispossessed?

Author James Glass is joining me today to celebrate the release of his highly anticipated sequel to THE MURDERED METATRON.

both books mm mm2THE DISPOSSESSED is Book 2 in The Metatron Mysteries series, and I hear the early readers are already begging for Book 3!

***

Playing host to the voice of God can be a strain,

and as John Smith is discovering,

the source of many hangovers.

Add to that a missing demon, and it’s one hell of a week.

***

While I’ve got James here, I thought I’d ask a few questions about the writing process for #METATRON

What kind of music do you listen to for inspiration?

Ultimately, the music depends on the story. When writing the Metatron Mysteries the playlists ran the gamut from Big Band to Industrial. I believe each story has its own evolving soundtrack and feel to it, and it is my task to discover that playlist and put it together as I put pen to paper.

Have you ever started a project, felt it run out of steam and had to abandon it? 

Never have I abandoned a project – yet. Then again, I have not written many stories, so perhaps my time will come. There was a point during the writing of the second Metatron book where I was trapped in a type of limbo with my characters in a small town called Port Jervis, but that is about the closest I’ve come to abandoning all hope.

What’s the most shocking book or story you’ve ever read?

The closest I have come to being shocked by anything I’ve read was a very graphic scene in Lamia by Suzi M. To this day I cringe when I think about it.

Do you remember a particular moment or incident that made you decide to be a writer?

No moment in particular, no. I was born a writer, I suspect.

Do you have a certain space and time set aside for writing or is it more of a free-form process?

It is very much a freeform process because I go where the characters take me. Typically I begin writing in a notebook and eventually translate the written word to typed pages. The most recent example I can give of just how freeform the process is would be during the writing of The Murdered Metatron. I wrote an entire scene from the observation deck of the 44th New York Infantry Monument at Little Roundtop in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania after walking there from the center of town. While looking down on Devil’s Den I remembered a story I had overheard about the stream running through the area and the short story ‘The Vampire of Plum Run’ was born. I am never quite sure what ideas will appear from the ether, or which characters.

How would you describe your writing style?

Hard-boiled urban neo-Noir.

What other sorts of themes or genres would you like to explore?

I have explored erotica as well as horror and been told I am good at both. I do enjoy my detective stories, however.

Please briefly describe your path to publication.

Quite a happy accident, to be honest. I began with random work on Suzi M’s website as a resident writer, took a hiatus and wandered aimlessly for some time, and then it was as if I was resurrected somehow. I wrote the first installment of the Metatron Mysteries with no real expectations other than it would be my best-seller. Shortly after its publication I happened into a conversation with Jennifer Greene over at Sekhmet Press LLC and here we are.

Who are your favorite fictional antagonist and protagonist and what was it about them that struck a chord for you?

To be honest, there are so many I thoroughly enjoy it would be difficult to pick just a pair out and hold them aloft as The Favorite. It is a shifting sandstorm of preferences. The most memorable for me – and possibly because I know the authors quite well – would be Nemesis and Lamia from the Immortal War Series by Suzi M (for those who have read the series, you may recognize Azrael and the nod to Lamia within the pages of The Murdered Metatron), and Kain from the short story ‘Sundogs’ by Xircon (who subsequently makes an appearance in my next work). In Xircon’s novella ‘The Lazarus Stone’ there is a character – the main character, really – who has no name and can easily balance between both antagonist and protagonist at the same time. He fascinates me perhaps because he is a stark contrast to the over-the-top element in the previously mentioned Immortal War Series, the difference between gods versus gods and a man as a lonely god in an empty world.

Aside from writing, what is your favorite artistic medium?

I enjoy painting and playing the mandolin.

Mandolin! You never fail to surprise us James. Thank you so much for being here and I wish you the very best of luck in all of your endeavours and may The Dispossessed go straight to Number 1!

Discover more about James and THE METATRON MYSTERIES

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James Glass

James Glass enjoys his privacy, but frequently finds that he plays an unwilling host to Xircon. When not visiting red light districts of red light cities, he can frequently be found contemplating life in the seediest of libraries.


The Guide: Celebrating Women in Fiction 2014

Via Sekhmet Press LLC 

The Guide: Celebrating Women in Fiction 2014.

Welcome to Books, Babes, and the Business

We will be celebrating women in fiction the entire month of February.

We will  host a guest blogger each day, then on February 28th from 1-3 pm EST you can join us on Facebook for a big party! We’ll have virtual refreshments, hilarious games, and REAL PRIZES! Don’t miss it! Invite your friends!

Feb 1. Welcome to Celebrating Women in Fiction 2014
2. Allison M. Dickson
3. Killion Slade ….CLICK FOR FULL SCHEDULE


WORLD OF BLOOD – Exsanguinate

Author Interview with Killion Slade

Who doesn’t love a great vampire series, especially at Christmas time!

Today we’re interviewing the married writing team, Killion Slade, and featuring their newly released novel

Exsanguinate

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Amidst an impending vampire apocalypse, Cheyenne finds herself both in conflict for survival and for her heart. Will her immortal self derail any hope of solving the multiplying puzzles before time runs out to save her sisters, herself and her humanity?

WATCH THE TRAILER

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Q.  How did you meet?

A. We met in the virtual reality online game Second Life. Mr. Slade was selling his real world photographs to other game players, and Mrs. Slade was doing research for a client related to the World of Warcraft. After a casual meeting at a dance club, it was discovered that we both worked in the same profession with separate specialties. This led to days at work conferencing  over VoIP, and evenings virtually dating on Second Life. Less than a year later, Mrs. Slade had made the move to Montana. Virtually commuting days at the day job and spending evenings together in real life became our normal lifestyle.blog killion2

Q.  This novel has an interactive second screen website?

A.  Yes, we were inspired by Chantal Noordeloos from her recent release on Coyote, with their second screen version.  To read our novel, it is stand alone, but for those who want a little more – we provided the extra special secret bonus features.  We like to think of it as a Blu-ray of reading.  You loved the movie – now you want to see the special features, deleted scenes, interviews with the characters, etc.  That is how we envisioned a reader might want to enjoy a few of the extended scenes which didn’t necessarily move the story forward or have the action required, but they would enjoy reading an extended zombie parade scene, a Battle Kroc fight sequence, or expand on the haunted houses inside the theme park.

The ebook version has interactive links to the World of Blood website which does exactly that.  It allows the reader, if they so desire, to navigate to the website from their phone, tablet or PC and read the extras, check out the pictures, and learn more from each character’s dossier.  The printed book has a QR code is embedded in the text inviting the reader to experience more if they would like to explore.

Each version of the book stands alone on its own.  A reader need not use the website to enjoy the story. The website is for the extra little goodies. Scenes that we wanted to include, but didn’t necessarily move the story forward at the fast pace needed in today’s instant gratification society.  For example, we enjoyed writing out a detailed zombie parade scene, it was great fun, but all of that detail didn’t have direct impact on the plot structure and needed to be cut.  We wanted to reward the reader who would like to have read the zombie parade scene, and now they can.

Q.  How do you story board inside Second Life?

A. Together we own a small section of mainland where we have a photography studio and enough room to build custom backdrops. The studio has hundreds of poses as well as third party “pose balls” which enable us to position the avatars to build our scenes. Not only does this allow us to set a scene, it also gives us a reason to spend time where we met. Our book trailers rely heavily on the scenes created inside Second Life.

Q.  Why did you choose to write this story?

A. We had both done some personal writing in the past. Deeply interested in vampires, dragons, and other preternatural and natural phenomenon, a spark formed. We began talking about a story line that encompassed our combined interests. This story involves items from history, mythology, virtual realities, and our imaginations.

Q.  Is it hard to write with your spouse?

A. We must both admit that yes, writing with a spouse can definitely have its challenges. But the rewards outweigh any obstacle thrown at us. It’s fun to have a conversation about people who don’t exist and turn them into characters people can enjoy.

Q.  Would you do it again?

A. Not only would we, but we have planned out the World of Blood series to include five, possibly six books.  We look to release The Blood Oath – World of Blood – Book Two in 2014.

About the Author

blog killion1Killion Slade is a married writing team who met in the virtual realms of Second Life and virtually enjoy everything. Members of the Horror Writers Association and the Paranormal Romance Guild, they storyboard their characters inside Second Life as their avatars reveal their stories. Tucked away in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in Northern Montana, they stay busy chasing kids, corralling horses and cats, and enjoying the harvest from their garden. Married on Halloween – they love to live life to the fullest and embrace one another each and every day.

Killion Slade can be reached at the following:
Email:  Killion@killionslade.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/killion.slade
Website:  http://www.killionslade.com/contact/

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Author Appearing in Asheville NC!

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Patrick C. Greene will be appearing LIVE on The Jeff Messer Show and at Mr. K’s Books in Asheville NC

 FRIDAY 11/8/2014

Patrick will be LIVE on the Jeff Messer Radio Show on 880am around

4:30pm

radio logoListen LIVE on iHEART RADIO 

 

After that Patrick will be at Mr. K’s Books signing books and running his mouth from

6-8pm

mr k books2Mr. K’s BOOKS

 

Come out and see us!

 


A Chat with Debut Horror Novelist Allison M. Dickson

Sekhmet Press LLC

REBLOG FROM

The Dark Phantom Review

Q: Congratulations on the release of your latest book, STRINGS. What was your inspiration for it?

A: The book originally began life as a short story I had out for awhile on Amazon called “The Good Girls,” where I told the story of a young and indebted prostitute assigned to visit a horrifying hermit as her final job. But when other readers told me the story read like the beginning to a much longer book, I decided to run with that and the book was born a short time later. I really wanted to tell a story that didn’t have a true hero. I wanted to explore elements of control and freedom, and whether or not those things were illusions. I was inspired a lot by the great crime fiction of Gillian Flynn and Dennis Lehane, but I wanted to add my own special…

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